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India Records 1.94 Lakh Fresh Covid Cases, Positivity Rate Over 11%

The daily positivity rate - or number of people infected per 100 tests - is 11.5 percent, this morning's government data shows

India reported 1,94,720 COVID-19 cases as of now, 15.8 percent higher than yesterday 1.68 lakh cases. The daily positivity rate – or the number of people infected per 100 tests – is 11.5 percent, this morning’s government data shows.

The nation has up until this point reported 4,868 cases of Omicron infection, the highly transmissible Covid variation first detected in South Africa. Maharashtra has the most Omicron cases with 1,281, followed by Rajasthan with 645 cases.

More than 153 crore vaccine dosages have been administered in India since the time vaccination began, making a critical achievement in the battle against COVID-19.

At least 120 districts in 29 states and Union Territories have reported a weekly positivity rate of 10 percent in the third wave of the pandemic.

India is giving booster doses to frontline medical workers and those above 60 with comorbidities. Despite this, the Omicron variant is “almost unstoppable” and everyone will eventually be infected with it.

Booster vaccine doses won’t stop the rapid spread of the viruses, said Dr Jaiprakash Muliyil, epidemiologist and chairperson of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the National Institute of Epidemiology at the Indian Council of Medical Research, adding that Omicron presents itself just like the cold.

“It makes no difference. The infection will occur. It has occurred all over the world regardless of this,” Dr Muliyil said about the booster doses.

In the third wave of the pandemic, most infected peoples have recovered at home and the level of hospitalizations has been not exactly 50% of that seen during the last major wave of infections in April and May.

Many states have announced night curfews while Delhi also imposed a weekend lockdown last week, closed private offices as well as restaurants and bars in a bid to rein in the fast-spreading Omicron variant.